Why Am I So Cold After Exercising

Why am i so cold after exercising

It’s most likely exercise-induced interstitial pulmonary edema.

thanks but i dont really know what that is. is that a serious problem that i should make sure i get looked at before i can work out again?

thanks but i dont really know what that is. is that a serious problem that i should make sure i get looked at before i can work out again?

Nope, basically hard cardio work especially in cold weather or at high altitude forces fluid (plasma) into your lungs. Then you cough to get rid of it. Serious pulmonary edema can cause too much fluid to build up in your lungs and you won’t be able to breathe, but that’s unlikely to happen

It’s most likely exercise-induced interstitial pulmonary edema.

No, it’s really not. Asthma is the most exercise-induced respiratory problem with these exact symptoms. Pulmonary edema occurs, but often produces a pink, frothy mucus along with other symptoms (especially iron taste and coughing up blood). The number one cause for coughing post-exercise is asthma. I’ve had both and studied both and they are very different beasts.

No, it’s really not. Asthma is the most exercise-induced respiratory problem with these exact symptoms. Pulmonary edema occurs, but often produces a pink, frothy mucus along with other symptoms (especially iron taste and coughing up blood). The number one cause for coughing post-exercise is asthma. I’ve had both and studied both and they are very different beasts.

Ok. Do you find it strange that he’s never had asthma before?

Ok. Do you find it strange that he’s never had asthma before?

With CrossFit, most people ramp up the intensity as they go on. Some people don’t really hit near-max intensities until they are very, very comfortable with doing WODs. I’m an intense person and it took me about 6 weeks to hit that intensity. Asthma can also be aggravated by weather changes, allergens present, movements completed, and other varying environmental factors. I found out I had asthma going from a cold room to the hot, allergen ridden outside on a run after overhead squat. He didn’t tell us what WOD he was doing when these symptoms came out. Running after heavy lifting tends to be especially aggravating to the lungs.

Ok here is an example of the day it was probably the worst. we do wendlers 5-3-1 strength program along with the WOD and this day was deadlift day. The Wod on that day was Cindy.
After that one I had some issues.

However, In the past week since I posted this I have had a couple of WOD that left me feeling the same way Cindy did but I havent had the cough so I dont know.

I’m a tiny bit sick right now (rarity for me, I’m annoyed), so I’ll try to induce that on purpose. Yesterday I hit the heavy bag and did sprawls with some good intensity for almost 20 minutes wearing three pairs of pants and three shirts, including a big heavy hoodie. Got me all nice and sweaty and gross and spitting :censored: up, and it sucked because I was tired and fatigued and weary and all that. But once I was done I felt like I was well again.

Something about it gets the toxins out. The point of my story: it’s not always a bad thing.

This is helpful. I have been coughing after any cardio, running, rowing exercises. I taste copperish blood yucky stuff and just cough and feel short of breathe. What is going on!?

People seem to get that taste when they first start doing heavy-breathing aerobic kind of stuff. I don’t know what it is, but in my experience, and people I’ve heard from about it, it goes away the more you do it. So. maybe you’re out of aerobic shape?

People seem to get that taste when they first start doing heavy-breathing aerobic kind of stuff. I don’t know what it is, but in my experience, and people I’ve heard from about it, it goes away the more you do it. So. maybe you’re out of aerobic shape?

It’s pulmonary edema.

I am new, only been crossfitting for about 6 weeks and am definitely out of shape. After some hard (or hard for me) met cons that really push me to the edge, for the next few hours I have a bit of a cough and have some phlegm build up. The phlegm is similiar to how one feels at the tail end of a chest cold, very loose. after a few hours I am fine, no more cough or phlegm. Is this normal or should I be concerned. Also let me say I have never had asthma, and i dont taste copper or have any blood in my saliva or anything. any thoughts?

Your symptoms sound uncomfortable. You’ve heard some internet suggestions here, now go see a physician. They are often quick to Dx asthma; ask for some differential Dx if he does as you don’t want that label for life.

It could be something as minor as a long standing virus that keeps you hacking. especially since you say you are not short of breath (any wheezing?).

It’s pulmonary edema.

Okay. what does that mean for us workout people, exactly?

Okay. what does that mean for us workout people, exactly?

Intense aerobic workouts cause the capillaries of the blood-gas barrier to burst, literally. This causes a little bit of blood to flow into your lungs, which causes copper taste and coughing.

Intense aerobic workouts cause the capillaries of the blood-gas barrier to burst, literally. This causes a little bit of blood to flow into your lungs, which causes copper taste and coughing.

They don’t burst.

Backup from the bloodflow pushes fluid out into the lungs (since they’re semipermeable). It’s more like the clear stuff you would see when your scab is leaking the clear plasma

If they burst that would REALLY suck in a life threatening kind of way.

Either way, I’m assuming that the more you do it the more your body adapts to it in the lungs and then it stops happening so much, yeah?

Also, anyone know why exactly cold air does it more?

Either way, I’m assuming that the more you do it the more your body adapts to it in the lungs and then it stops happening so much, yeah?

Also, anyone know why exactly cold air does it more?

Well, your heart capacity improves, so yeah.

Pulmonary edema is a back up of blood flow that leads to icnreased pressure forcing fluid out,

if theres a back up of blood flow in the lungs its because the L ventricle aint pushing out enough to keep up with your body’s need for cardiac output.

thus, heart will likely hypertrophy and stretch a bit more.

Cold air = bronchoconstriction = constriction leads to increased pressure = increased pressure forces more fluid out into the lungs

Either way, I’m assuming that the more you do it the more your body adapts to it in the lungs and then it stops happening so much, yeah?

Also, anyone know why exactly cold air does it more?

Well, if it’s edema, then the body will improve heart function and fix this problem. If it’s asthma, then damage is actually being done to the lining of the lungs.

Also, asthma is known best for causing bronchospasms in cold, dry air. The dry air running over the bronchi leaches moisture from the lining and the cold simply decreases compliance and ability to expand appropriately.

On top of that, sputum post-exercise is never normal. Exercise induced asthma is THE MOST COMMON respiratory issue amount active individuals. It’s also very easily treatable.

To address some earlier statements: allergic asthma (such as childhood asthma) does not work the same way as exercise-induced asthma. Allergic asthma has to do with an immune response to airborne particles (dander, pollen, dust, etc). Also, how active has Scott been throughout his life? Has he pushed himself as hard as he does with CF? Exercise-induced asthma is intensity dependent. So no, it’s not a surprise that he hasn’t had symptoms of asthma before this.

I worked out and now I’m SO SORE. Help?

“Dear Steve, I think my legs are dying and I can’t walk. HALP!”

Yesterday, or two days ago, you did a strenuous workout for the first time in your life (or for the first time in a while).В You dutifully did your squats, push-ups, and rows (if you followed the Beginner Bodyweight workout), or you did some barbell squatsВ or deadliftsВ or pull-ups. Or maybe you decided to run a 5k just for kicks.

And during the workout, you may have felt pretty good!

That was two days ago,В though. When you woke up yesterday, every muscle in your body felt like it was hit by a mack-truck.В “Welp, this sucks, but at least tomorrow things should be better,” you tell your brain.

And holy crap, it’s like your body forgot how to function.В Maybe yourВ arms are stuck in the permanent t-rex position. Perhaps yourВ groin is tight in places you didn’t even realize you could be sore. Walking down stairs or doing anything active may feel like trying to play the QWOP game (please take 2 seconds to play this – it will be the hardest you’ve ever laughed).

So, what are you supposed to do:

If it’s been only a day,В should you be worried?

Maybe it’s been two days and you are supposed to work out.В Do you skip it?

These are important questions, and the answers totally depend on how you’re training, your level of experience, your goals, and so on.

If you have those questions plus a billion other ones about how to strength train properly, you’re not alone! MOST people don’t bother asking those questions, and waste years (I wasted 6 years!) training without results!

If you want to skip the trial-and-error follies most people go through (and often never get out of!), you can work with one of our trained coaches in our 1-on-1 Online Coaching Program:В customized workout programs structured to help you get stronger and reach your goals, form checks to make sure you’re doing things safely, and professional accountability from somebody that actually cares about you (crazy, I know! haha).

You can learn more about this program by clicking on the image below to schedule a free call with us:В

Okay, back to training and soreness. Right now, if you are sore, you’re probably torn between sitting in an ice bath to numb the soreness or climbing into a hot tub until you resemble a prune.

Let me first introduce you to my obnoxious friend, DOMS.

Although you’re probably already familiar, you’ve never been formally introduced to DOMSВ (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness).

First of all, don’t panic. DOMS is totally natural, and you’re going to be fine. Great, even!

In short, DOMS is a result of teeny tiny tears in your muscles from really strenuous activity, meaning you did things that your body is not normally used to.

If you’re brand new to working out or have taken a few weeks off only to jump back in at a high level of stress (heavy squats after a few weeks off), think of DOMS like your muscles saying: in exchange for the recovery I have to do, I’m going make YOU feel it. And actually, although it may not feel like it, this process is TOTALLY normal.

It tends to peak around 48 hours after training, but can occur anytime after your training day (hence the “Delayed” part of DOMS).

Note: this should definitely feel like a soreness (even a painful or deep soreness is okay), but a sharp pain or severe pain isВ something you should speak to your doctor about.

So, think of our friend DOMS like an obnoxious friend complaining:

“Whoa whoa whoa, I didn’t sign up for this much activity. You just did a lot of things I’m not used to. So I’m going to piss you off tomorrow and make you super sore. And the day after that? It’s going to be WORSE.”

What an ass! Like most bros, our boy DOMS hates Leg Day and wants you to skip it (like he and all the other bros do).В So you may notice that DOMS tends to punish you more for big compound lifts like squats, deadlifts, lunges, etc.

Is Doms Good for Me Or Bad For Me?

Now you’re thinking, “I read on a motivational poster once “No Pain, No Gain!” …В is that true?”

What you’re really asking is: “is this muscle soreness good for me? Does that mean it’s working? What about TOO much soreness?”

When you exercise (especially strength train), you’re breaking down your muscles, and over the next few days they are rebuilding themselves up stronger.

But if you are SUPPOSED to break down your muscles, then soreness is good. And if SOME soreness is good, then DOMS should be yourВ new best friend because it means it’s REALLY working, right? Maybe.

THE TRUTH:В Yes, being sore after a workout can be a sign that you adequately pushed your muscles hard to elicit a response from them – especially if you haven’t worked out that hard in a while. So, DOMS is that friend you want to see occasionally, but not a friend you want to hang out with every day.

This means that once you get used to this level of training, DOMS will go away and you can make huge progress in your training without this soreness.

Don’t think that you need to be sore in order to get a good workout. DOMS goes away quickly and most of your progress will come without DOMS.

DOMS isn’t a total friend though.В You might feel so sore and stiff and tight that you don’t think you could possibly work outВ today (even though it’s a scheduled workout day).

Download our free guide, Strength Training 101: Everything You Need to Know! Get it free when you sign up for our email list in the box below.

  • Everything you need to know about getting strong.
  • Workout routines for bodyweight AND weight training.
  • How to find the right gym and train properly in one.

So, some soreness is good, but don’t go searching to destroy yourself in a single session. We’re after real, long term progress, remember?

That’s why we subscribe to eight-time Mr. Olympia Lee Haney’s motto: “stimulate, not annihilate” method of training at Nerd Fitness. I don’t want you puking, I don’t want you so sore you can’t move, I don’t want you so tired at the end of a workout that you just want to lie down on a mat and die.

Yup, it’s tough to find that balance, especially if you’re brand new to training and have no idea what level of soreness you should feel. Most people first feel DOMS and think something is wrong, when in fact that level of soreness is totally normal.

Don’t be afraid to take a trial and error, self-experimentation mindset!

Of course, if you’re sitting there right now with T-Rex arms and leg muscles so sore you’re like Tin Man, you’re probably thinking the following:

Luckily, the next section is for you.

What do I do Today Though?

So you’ve met DOMS, and whether it’s been 24 or 48 or 72 hours, he’s pretty much immobilized you. В I realize the following is going to sound counterintuitive, but trust me:

You’re going to do your workout today.В If it’s the day after the workout, you’re going to do some light activity.

Is it two days after (aka your next workout)? Yup, you’re going to go through a solid warm-up, and no matter how sore you are, you’re going to do your next workout. You see, when you exercise, you’re increasing blood flow to your muscles. By putting your body through the motions,В you’re actually speeding up your recovery.

No, this will not cause further damage to your muscles. In fact, this is the best possible way to improve the soreness you’re currently feeling. Yes, it’s going to suck for the first fewВ repetitions, but each repetition is exercising those sore muscles, stretching them back out, and making them less sore. Think of it like you’re showing your muscles there’s really nothing to be afraid of.

Movement is the best cure for soreness.В

That’s why if you’re feeling sore the day immediately after, you can stretch, take a walk, and perform light versions of your movements in order to expedite the healing process!

So when in doubt, move and stretch. This can be done throughout the day, when you wake up, before, during, and after your workout.

Just MOVE MORE !

Just remember that because you’re so sore and tight, your range of motion initially will be much smaller than a few days prior.

If you want to help fighting off DOMS, consider mixing in some Nerd Fitness YogaВ on your off days to speed up recovery and elongate those muscles!

Using a foam roller might help a lot too to combat soreness. Scope this video for a brief tutorial on how to get rolling:

If you have even more questions about soreness, training, how to move properly, mobility, the cosmos, and more…you’re in the right place!

We actually created our 1-on-1 coaching programВ to help busy people like you fit strength training correctly into their lifes!В You’ll work with our NF instructors who will get to know you better than you know yourself, create a workout program specific to your lifestyle and experience, and then help keep you accountable with your nutrition and your life!

It’s training that you’ll actually do, nutrition advice that you’ll actually follow, and results that actually stick:

TL;DR:

  • Don’t fear DOMS.
  • Keep to your workout schedule.
  • Use light activity and stretching to recover quicker and feel better.

What other questions do you have about our obnoxious friend DOMS?

-Steve

PS: If you enjoyed this article but you’re not quite fired up to join our coaching program, that’s cool! You can sign up for our free Rebellion email list and get 6 ebooks free to help you get started!

Why Do I Feel Nauseous after Exercising?

Many people find that they will feel nauseous after they exercise. Exercising is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, but sometimes the nausea that follows exercise can severely limit a person’s desire and ability to exercise. By understanding what can cause you to feel nauseous after exercising, you may be able to avoid or reduce the amount of nausea that you feel after exercise.

Many times, nausea after exercising is caused by dehydration. If your body does not get a sufficient amount of water before, during, and after exercising, you can become dehydrated. Dehydration is one of the most common causes of feeling nauseous after exercising. To keep from becoming dehydrated, you should try to drink a minimum of two cups of water roughly two hours before you start your exercise routine. 20 minutes before you begin your routine, you should drink 2 more cups of water. While you are exercising, you should also keep a water bottle nearby. During exercise, you should drink around half a cup of water for every ten to fifteen minutes of your exercise routine. If you follow these guidelines, you should be able to avoid becoming dehydrated, and to avoid the nausea that comes with dehydration.

Another cause of feeling nauseous after exercising can be exercising on an empty stomach. It is important to exercise when your body is full of nutrients. On the other hand, you shouldn’t exercise right after you eat, either. During exercise, your body will cause fluids to move away from your muscles into your gastrointestinal tract so that you can digest your food. This can not only cause you to feel nauseous after exercising, it can make your exercise less effective. Ideally, you will want to wait about 1-2 hours after eating before you exercise. For this reason, you should also avoid eating during exercise. The size of the meal that you eat will determine the time you should wait. If you have a light meal or a meal replacement drink, you should wait an hour. If you have a regular meal, you should wait about two hours. If you eat a heavy meal or overindulge, you should try to wait at least three hours before starting your exercise routine.

Eating sweets like candy or drinking pop just before you exercise can also cause you to feel nauseous after exercising. Your blood sugar can drop after an insulin rise, and result in fatigue or nausea. Try to wait at least an hour after having any form of sweets before you begin your exercise routine.

If you have tried these tips and still feel nauseous after exercising, you should discuss the problem with your health care provider. She may be able to check to see if there is some other cause for your nausea, or recommend ways to keep from becoming nauseous.

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