Why Am I So Cold After C Section

How soon after a caesarean can I get pregnant?

Joseph Aquilina

Consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist

It’s best for you to wait at least six months after your caesarean section before becoming pregnant again. A year would be even better. The longer you leave your scar to heal, the stronger it will be.

You’ll remember how long it takes to recover from a caesarean. You probably felt exhausted and sore at first. And you may not be back to all your day-to-day activities if it wasn’t that long ago. So make sure you give your body a really good opportunity to recover before your next pregnancy.

In most caesareans, a cut is made just along the top of your pubic hair. This is called a bikini cut. It usually heals by three months after your baby’s birth. But waiting at least six months may be particularly important if you want to try for a vaginal birth next time. This is called a VBAC, which is a vaginal birth after caesarean.

There is a very low risk of your caesarean scar tearing with a VBAC. This is called uterine rupture. Even though the risk is low, it may increase if there is a short gap between your pregnancies.

A small gap also increases your risk of having a low-lying placenta (placenta praevia) or that the placenta will separate from your womb (uterus). This is a serious complication known as placental abruption.

This may sound frightening, but all these risks are very low. The most important factor is that you and your partner feel ready for another baby.

Learn more about what to expect from different sibling age gaps.

Recovery room

Definition

The recovery room, also called a post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), is a space a patient is taken to after surgery to safely regain consciousness from anesthesia and receive appropriate post-operative care.

Description

Patients who have had surgery or diagnostic procedures requiring anesthesia or sedation are taken to the recovery room, where their vital signs (e.g., pulse, blood pressure, temperature, blood oxygen levels) are monitored closely as the effects of anesthesia wear off. The patient may be disoriented when he or she regains consciousness, and the recovery room nursing staff will work to ease their anxiety and ensure their physical and emotional comfort.

The recovery room staff will pay particular attention to the patient’s respiration, or breathing, as the patient recovers from anesthesia. A pulse oximeter , a clamp-like device that attaches to a patient’s finger and uses infrared light to measure the oxygen saturation level of the blood, is usually used to assess respiratory stability. If the oxygen saturation level is too low, supplemental oxygen may be administered through a nasal cannula or face mask. Intravenous fluids are also frequently administered in the recovery room.

Because general anesthesia can cause a patient’s core body temperature to drop several degrees, retaining body heat to prevent hypothermia and encourage good circulation is also an important part of recovery room care. Patients may be wrapped in blankets warmed in a heater or covered with a forced warm-air blanket system to bring body temperature back up to normal. They may also receive heated intravenous fluids.

The amount of time a patient requires in the recovery room will vary by surgical or diagnostic procedure and the type of anesthesia used. As the patient recovers from anesthesia, their post-operative condition is assessed by the recovery room nursing staff. A physician may order analgesic or antiemetic medication for any pain or nausea and vomiting, and the surgeon and/or anesthesiologist may come by to examine the patient.

Both hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers have recovery room facilities, which are generally located in close proximity to the operating room . A recovery room may be private, or it may be a large, partitioned space shared by many patients. Each patient bay, or space, is equipped with a variety of medical monitoring equipment. To keep the area sterile and prevent the spread of germs, outside visitors may be required to don a gown and cap or may be prohibited completely. Spouses or partners of women who are recovering after caesarean section and the parents of children recovering from surgery are typically excluded from any visitor prohibitions in the recovery room. In fact, parents are usually encouraged to be with their child in recovery to minimize any emotional trauma.

In some ambulatory surgery facilities, patients may have a different post-operative experience if they receive short-acting anesthetic drugs for their procedure. This protocol, known as "fast tracking," involves either shortening the time spent in the PACU or, if clinically indicated, bypassing the PACU altogether and sending the patient directly to what is known as a phase II step-down unit. A step-down unit is an "in between" transitional care area where patients can rest and recover before discharge with a lesser degree of monitoring and staff attention then in a PACU.

Normal results

After the effects of anesthesia have worn off completely and the patient’s condition is considered stable, he or she will either be returned to their hospital room (for inpatient surgery) or discharged (for outpatient surgery ). Patients who are discharged will be briefed on post-operative care instructions to follow at home before they are released.

Hatfield, Anthea, and Michael Tronson. The Complete Recovery Room Book, 3rd edition. London: Oxford University Press, 2002.

periodicals

Duncan, Peter, et al. "A Pilot Study of Recovery Room Bypass ("Fast-track Protocol") in a Community Hospital." Canadian Journal of Anesthesia 48 (2001): 630.

Constant Nausea/Lower Abdominal Pain ESP After Eating

Guest over a year ago

I’m a 26 year old female. Don’t drink, don’t smoke. Healthy diet. I had a c-section about 7 months ago and over the course of the last 3 or 4 months have noticed weird intestinal pain. (although this could be totally unrelated)
First off, it seems I am nauseous ALL THE TIME. 75% of the time, I develop weird severe cramp-like pains after eating. usually within 15 minutes of finishing the food. They peak about 45 minutes after eating and calm down within 30 minutes after. It’s hard to describe the pain. It starts right under my rib cage in the center (not heartburn/not chest pain) and moves to around my belly button. The pain is sometimes soooo bad. I get extremely nauseous and have to sit very still until everything passes.
I also notice that when I have an empty stomach, I pass ALOT of gas and have ALOT of tummy rumbling. Usually in the mornings, I have discomfort around the belly button, until I eat. Then I’m fine until the pain kicks in. I’m almost scared to eat sometimes because I’m so tired of feeling bad.
I ALWAYS have a metallic-ish taste in my mouth. Feels like my tongue is burning. It gets somewhat relieved by chewing gum. The taste alone makes me queasy.
I was having a good intestinal day when I visited my GP, so I forgot to mention the intestinal issues and only brought up the nausea and bad taste because they were the worst problem that day. She said it sounded like severe reflux and put me on generic prilosec. which worked for about 2 weeks. Nausea is back, so is metallic taste. Of course, I failed to mention my intestinal problems at the doc’s visit. I could kick myself! So, I am posting to see if anyone has had any experiences like this.
I am so tired of this. From what I have found online, it seems like it could be anything. Some of my symptoms fit some things, but not entirely. So I’m just lost!
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Was wondering if these were a result of c-section or what.

Guest over a year ago

Do you still have the pain or did it eventually go away?

My symptoms are almost the same. It all started 2 or 3 months after my baby’s birth. I went to the doctor and he said that he thinks it’s due to breast feeding and that I loose to much fluids and therefore need to take in 2 liter water each day.

I also started to take probiotics as well which helps for irritable bowl syndrome. It seems to help a bit and my pain is not so extreme any more, but I still struggle with this pain after I have ate, the pain sometimes lasts an hour or more and then my lower back starts to hurt. I’m not constantly nauseous, but if the pain is strong I do feel nauseous.

I’m a 26 year old female. Don’t drink, don’t smoke. Healthy diet. I had a c-section about 7 months ago and over the course of the last 3 or 4 months have noticed weird intestinal pain. (although this could be totally unrelated)
First off, it seems I am nauseous ALL THE TIME. 75% of the time, I develop weird severe cramp-like pains after eating. usually within 15 minutes of finishing the food. They peak about 45 minutes after eating and calm down within 30 minutes after. It’s hard to describe the pain. It starts right under my rib cage in the center (not heartburn/not chest pain) and moves to around my belly button. The pain is sometimes soooo bad. I get extremely nauseous and have to sit very still until everything passes.
I also notice that when I have an empty stomach, I pass ALOT of gas and have ALOT of tummy rumbling. Usually in the mornings, I have discomfort around the belly button, until I eat. Then I’m fine until the pain kicks in. I’m almost scared to eat sometimes because I’m so tired of feeling bad.
I ALWAYS have a metallic-ish taste in my mouth. Feels like my tongue is burning. It gets somewhat relieved by chewing gum. The taste alone makes me queasy.
I was having a good intestinal day when I visited my GP, so I forgot to mention the intestinal issues and only brought up the nausea and bad taste because they were the worst problem that day. She said it sounded like severe reflux and put me on generic prilosec. which worked for about 2 weeks. Nausea is back, so is metallic taste. Of course, I failed to mention my intestinal problems at the doc’s visit. I could kick myself! So, I am posting to see if anyone has had any experiences like this.
I am so tired of this. From what I have found online, it seems like it could be anything. Some of my symptoms fit some things, but not entirely. So I’m just lost!
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Was wondering if these were a result of c-section or what.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *